Home Life Style Music seems to help unlock the memories of Alzheimer’s patients

Music seems to help unlock the memories of Alzheimer’s patients

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Every week, the DJ plays oldies on Staten Island, at the Todt Hill Senior Center. Likewise, Carol Daly, a 74-year old who was found to have the Alzheimer’s disease 12 years ago as takes a spin.

Dr Jon LaPook, the chief medical correspondent of CBS News, has been in sequence with Carol and her husband Mike right from 2008, monitoring her decline and seeing their love story.
LaPook said when they saw themselves this spring, Carol was merely talking, and there was a significant difference in Carol. Mike speaking about the difference said that’s why they live so long.

Caregivers such as Mike are bent on finding anything that can improve life quality. As such, CBS introduced the Music and Memory program to Dalys. The program was made by Dan Cohen, a social worker.

Music lights up several parts of the brain

According to Cohen, the senses, including sight and smell light up a small portion of the brain, but music lightens many parts of the brain. Therefore, while the brain may decline in some areas, other areas of the brain remain intact.

Cohen came to know of this idea. He began to give out iPods to therapeutic home residents so they can stream and enjoy personalized music. One of the first health care centers to try out the iPod thingy was Cobble Hill Health Center in Brooklyn.

After about ten years, it went viral and was already on about 4,500 sites. The Music and Memory program allowed friends and family to make the playlist.

LaPook observed that Carol recited some of the songs’ lyrics as she listened to them via her headphones

Cohen said that our emotions have links to the music we love, and our emotional system does not tamper. He went on to say that the emotional system is what is being connected, and it works.

It’s more than Mike could handle, and LaPook asked if it’s a real poignant while it’s seen as one. He added that it all lies in knowing that she hasn’t lost all.